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What is the fictional death you'll never forget?

I saw it trending on Twitter and it got me thinking, most of these will be from our childhood's. With more programmes we can view because of the internet will our kids deal with grief of fictional characters differently? some sort of online-fake-grief overload?

Seeking Opinion Child Development , Video & Films 3 years ago
Scott Collen admin
Scott Collen
Social and Community Geek
London, GB

4 experts and 8 parents have answered

expert answer
Richard Taylor expert
Richard Taylor Father of 4 boys & IT Consultant Bushmills, GB
Technology expert

Not having a TV growing up meant that I was never really exposed to anything like that on TV. We grew up in the land of Enid Blyton, so there was never any shocking or graphic deaths at all, and our days were spent playing outside building swings, tree houses and huts (quite idyllic really looking back!)

There was a book called I am David that I read when I was about 11 or 12 that really affected me because of the various deaths within the book, but no individual character. I cant remember if that was fictional, or based on a real character though.

The most traumatic set of deaths that I vividly remember watching (though not fictional given that it was based on real events) was in Schindlers List, especially when the girl who was the cook for the camp commandant was shot. Such a powerful and emotional film, yet so important to have watched.

3 Reply Share:
Experience 3 years ago
Seb James
Seb James Developer of logmykidsoff.com Sheffield

Goodnight Mr Tom. That was a very memorable story.

3 Reply Share:
Experience 3 years ago
Holly Seddon admin
Holly Seddon Editor-in-chief of Quib.ly Kent, UK

I was generally more upset about fictional animals dying (any animals) than any human characters but more recently, I was very upset by Breaking Bad. If you've not yet watched it, look away now because this IS A SPOILER.

I was so upset when Gale was killed in Breaking Bad. It was the unfairness, and what a gentle and trusting man he was. I wept buckets. I'm welling up now!

2 Reply ( 4 ) Share:
Experience 3 years ago
expert answer
Robert Drummond expert
Robert Drummond Teacher, ICT Co-Ordinator GB
Education expert

The Blackadder IV soldiers getting killed at the end of the series.

2 Reply ( 1 ) Share:
Experience 3 years ago
expert answer
Stacie Davis expert
Stacie Davis Librarian Port Allen, US
Education expert

Dumbledore...I was out with my parents and husband at a casino. I reading my book instead (because I am a dork) and I remember sitting on the "porch" in a rocking chair at Bo Cats, a southern looking bar in the casino with tears streaming down my face at the death of Dumbledore in Harry Potter.

2 Reply ( 1 ) Share:
Experience 3 years ago
Francesco admin
Francesco Founder @ Quib.ly London, GB

Don't need to go back to my childhood for this one....Eddard (Ned) Stark in Game of Thrones. Who could have possibly have predicted his death at the end of the first series (HBO) / book? Brilliant!

2 Reply Share:
Opinion 3 years ago
Simon Munk writer
Simon Munk Consumer tech journalist, mountain biker, dad of two. Walthamstow

In adult terms, and as a parent, the scene at the end of Kill List is one of the most harrowing things I've seen in a while. It's one of the most unusual films in ages. But I'd also only recommend it with massive caveats (you need a taste for the grim, horrific and gruesomely violent - and it will ruin your night).

From a similarly adult perspective, I found much of the videogame Heavy Rain very upsetting - without giving much away part of it is about an architect grieving for his dead son.

Watching stuff with the kids, I've yet to hear of a parent who doesn't well up at the opening section of Up, the Pixar film.

And as to what affected me as a kid - I don't remember much that did. I was quite old before I really understood death, or what it meant. And Hollywood/book death is so rarely done in a way that brings it home - Bambi's mum etc. is handled very coyly (we saw it recently with the kids). It was probably a non-fictional death as a child that I remember - seeing a homeless guy on the ground having turned blue-grey, with police and ambulance people around him.

2 Reply ( 1 ) Share:
Experience 3 years ago
Frankie Columbu
Frankie Columbu fitness fan and mother of two London, GB

Oh God, so many! Simba's dad from the Lion King and Bambi's mum didn't really bother me much when I first saw them but I was inconsolable watching them with my kids! Up, for obvious reasons and Marley from Marley and Me and when the Snowman melts in the Snowman. Sniff.

1 Reply Share:
Experience 3 years ago
Scotty Thick
Scotty Thick

Old Yellow and Jon Voight in The Champ...

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Experience 3 years ago
Tom Baker writer
Tom Baker Quib.ly Staff Writer Derby, UK

I think the idea that the prevalence of TV online making kids be less affected by fictional deaths is wrong - I'd suggest the opposite is true! Online fandoms get ludicrously passionate about the characters in shows (or books, or comics, or films...) they love, have real attachments to them, and have real visceral reactions when bad stuff happens to them.

Anyway, as for mine...other than Bambi as a kid? Films haven't done as much tugging on the heartstrings as books. Michael Chabon emotionally devastates me whenever I pick up one of his books, and The Art of Fielding has a pretty dramatic one. Most of my reading as a kid was of comics, and everyone knows nobody stays dead in them for very long!

1 Reply Share:
Opinion 3 years ago
0 Reply Share:
Experience 3 years ago
Kris Trevino Irvin
Kris Trevino Irvin Mom and full time student Draper, US

Qui Gon Jinn from Star Wars Episode 1: The Phantom Menace.

I was 12 years old and completely engrossed in the movie. I wanted to be a Jedi so badly. Over the course of 90 minutes, Qui-Gon became the father I never had. His death gutted me. I spent the next year pretending it never happened. Heck, I'm 26 and sometimes I ⋆still⋆ pretend it never happened!

0 Reply Share:
Experience 3 years ago

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