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Richard Taylor expert
Richard Taylor
Father of 4 boys & IT Consultant
Bushmills, GB

7 experts and 5 parents have answered

Holly Seddon admin
Holly Seddon Editor-in-chief of Quib.ly Kent, UK

My children's previous school held a touch typing club after school and that was great because it didn't take kids away from lunchtime play (which they would have resisted), and it also provided some handy extra working time for me! Most importantly though, it taught them a valuable skill and was taught in a fun, gamey way that encouraged a bit of healthy competition and they really enjoyed it.

I also believe that while they're using computers within lessons, there is an opportunity to teach good keyboard skills as a matter of course, rather than set it as a separate skillset with separate lesson time.

5 Reply Share:
Experience 4 years ago
expert answer
Robert Hart-Fletcher expert
Robert Hart-Fletcher Consultant and Developer GB
E-safety expert

When my kids were at the end of primary school, we paid for them to have touch typing lessons. I thought they'd find it really boring, but they were OK with it and persevered. Now they can touch type.

I, on the other hand never learned, since I thought the old qwerty keyboard would disappear as new technologies emerged. I was wrong and now wish I had learned! I type with three fingers and two thumbs and invariably have to go back over everything and correct a scatter of typos.

5 Reply ( 1 ) Share:
Experience 4 years ago
expert answer
Tia Fisher expert
Tia Fisher social media /child safety Bromley, GB
E-safety expert

I couldn't agree with you more. I've asked my children's school to run a programme, but they politely refused. As any parent will know, it's a lot harder for me to get my children motivated and dedicated to practising typing than it would be a teacher. I know the curriculum is rammed full, but I think at least a lunchtime club would be a good idea? Touchtyping isn't an option these days: it's a mandatory, and NOT being able to touchtype impedes my life all and every day! (Shhhhhhh..) Can anyone recommend any online course suited to rough tough 8 and 10 yr old boys?

4 Reply ( 6 ) Share:
Experience 4 years ago
expert answer
Julia Skinner expert
Julia Skinner Founder of 100 Word Challenge Bristol, GB
Education expert

The ability to touch type would be invaluable but as has already been pointed out, there is no time in the day to teach it. What would you take out of the curriculum to make the space? Handwriting maybe!

It is also one area where you would have to employ a specialist for those sessions and we all know that schools do not have the money. A school club is a good idea and maybe those parents who are keen for their children to have these skills would be prepared to pay for it.

3 Reply ( 1 ) Share:
Opinion 4 years ago
Lynn Hogg
Lynn Hogg Self Employed Mum of 2 Edinburgh, GB

The BBC website has a kids touch typing Game that looks suitable for primary age and might be helpful if doing it from home.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/typing/

3 Reply Share:
Opinion 4 years ago
expert answer
Lee Probert expert
Lee Probert Senior iOS Software Developer GB
Software/app development expert

Kids would hate it. Better to just get them using the computer at home whenever possible. I encourage my daughter to write stories on the computer as a way to boost her typing skills. We also play Moshi Monsters and Club Penguin so she gets a feel for the mouse and trackpad. I was never taught to touch-type but after years of coding it comes naturally.

2 Reply Share:
Experience 4 years ago
expert answer
Jordan Wright expert
Jordan Wright Director at Nous Education Paisley, GB
E-safety expert

I'd say that I was taught to touch type properly as part of a computing class at the start of secondary school however I found it more of burden than anything. I also remember it as a very pointless, boring experience. Only certain fingers were allowed to touch certain keys and I found it really tricky. Having used a keyboard for a few years before hand I knew how they worked and which buttons were where so I didn't see the need to touch type although I couldn't type very quickly at the time.

I have my own way of typing which I'm comfortable with, and I imagine many others are the same as me. I believe that it's not about which fingers hit specific keys, but how the person using the keyboard feels comfortable typing. It makes sense to me that it's more about the frequency of using a keyboard and how much practice the user gets - the more practice they get with their own methods the faster they'll become at typing without looking.

2 Reply Share:
Experience 4 years ago
expert answer
Jill Hodges expert
Jill Hodges Founder of Fire Tech Camp London, GB
Education expert

In a lot of US schools they've abandoned cursive/join-up writing for typing. My son has dysgraphia and he would be hugely served by learning to touch type (we're working on it outside school) - but with max 1 hr per week tech his school isn't hugely helpful!

2 Reply Share:
Opinion 4 years ago
Jax Blunt
Jax Blunt home educating geeky blogger GB

I'm using connective typing on a mobile phone to put my opinion on on this. I can touch type, I learnt using a computer game. There are quite a few free ones out there, if parents think it's important I'm sure they could facilitate it with their children. But as to the idea there is no time in the school curriculum, I find that a bit ridiculous. If touch typing is important, it should be prioritised. I don't think it is. There aren't that many people who really need to be able to type quickly in every day life. And by the time today's children are joining the work force we've no idea what technology will be available.

2 Reply Share:
Experience 4 years ago
expert answer
Roberto Catanuto expert
Roberto Catanuto Teacher, Club Instructor CH
Education expert

Touch-type is taught in my school at secondary level. Primary seems to me to be too early.

But the response from kids might greatly vary. So I'd gently give it a go, not as a mandatory requirements for kids, but as a little fun game, maybe.

If they would not learn it soon, there would be plenty of time left anyway.

1 Reply Share:
Opinion 4 years ago
Erika Kerekes
Erika Kerekes Mom of 2 boys, food blogger Santa Monica, US

My kids' school does teach touch-typing starting in 3rd grade. My older son was slow to pick it up and my husband was concerned. "Don't worry," I said. "As soon as he's on Facebook he'll learn to type. He just needs a reason beyond homework." Which turned out to be correct. :)

1 Reply ( 1 ) Share:
Experience 4 years ago
Paul Sutton
Paul Sutton I work in a school Torquay, GB

To comment on the last one above, when it comes to coding then touch typing will be pretty useful too.

0 Reply Share:
Opinion 3 years ago

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