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4 experts and 6 parents have answered

expert answer
Roberto Catanuto expert
Roberto Catanuto Teacher, Club Instructor CH
Education expert

I submit digital homework all the times the medium required for completing the work is digital.

I let students totally free to choose between paper and digital or else, whenever this doesn't hamper their creativity.

3 Reply Share:
Experience 3 years ago
Anthony Flower
Anthony Flower Father of three & web developer Christchurch, GB

As others have said this is 100% down to the teacher, they need to be asked first. You could find them praising the ingenuity and enjoying the variety in response to the assignment, you might also simply get "I asked you to build a model, not play a computer game".

One thing I would suggest though, write it up (illustrated with screenshots) as well as, or instead of, the Youtube video. That way there is still a physical document to hand in.

3 Reply Share:
Opinion 3 years ago
Joanne Mallon writer
Joanne Mallon Author, parent, blogger Brighton, The City of Brighton and Hove, UK

If a child is asked to create something, does that always have to be a physical something or is digital now an accepted alternative?

My son has been set a homework project as part of his World War 2 topic at school. He’s been asked to construct a World War 2 bunker. I think that when the teachers set this task, they

probably had visions of children cobbling something together with sticky tape and cereal packets.

But these are 21st century kids, so inevitably their minds turn to technology. What my son wants to do is to construct his bunker on Minecraft. He would then create a YouTube video explaining what he’s done. So instead of a pile of wobbly cardboard, he’d hand in his homework in the form of a URL.

Is this an imaginative response to the task, or should children stick more closely to the homework they’ve been set? And if they do go down the digital route, what happens if you come up against a teacher who’s not so up to speed with technology?

The other problem I can see with digital homework is that it’s less easy to tell what is authentically the child’s own work. With wobbly projects coloured in by hand it’s pretty easy to see where a 10 year old has done it all themselves, and where the parent has lent an overly-helping hand.

My children do already get set digital homework - maths assignments direct them to a website where they fill out sums and their scores are fed back to the teacher. So if teachers are setting online homework, is it acceptable to return other assignments this way?

Does your child have to do homework in digital form?

2 Reply ( 1 ) Share:
Experience 3 years ago
expert answer
Bob Zenhausern expert
Bob Zenhausern CEO Enabling Support Foundation New York, US
Education expert

Only the teacher can answer that question. If the teacher will not accept a digital project then your son must follow directions. It is not a battle he can win. It is up to you.

The next step is at a teacher parent conference where you can suggest to the teacher or administrators that we are living in the 21st century.

As an aside I plan to explore Minecraft as a gift for my 9 year old grandson who has a knack for building. Thanx for the information.

2 Reply ( 1 ) Share:
Opinion 3 years ago
expert answer
Brett Laniosh expert
Brett Laniosh ICT and Online Safety Consultant Catshill, GB
Education expert

I promote home <> school communications in a number of ways but they are all cloud based. If the school has a learning platform/portal then why not use that? Alternatively j2e.com is a great collaborative tool for pupils, teachers and parents!

2 Reply Share:
Experience 3 years ago
LeeAnn Marie Wilson
LeeAnn Marie Wilson Physics. :>

It should depend on the assignment, the class, the teacher, the student, ect. I think it's extremely convenient for group projects because of the use of cloud-based programs so they can work on it. For some students that have bad handwriting, typing is a more legible and comfortable alternative also.

2 Reply Share:
Opinion 3 years ago
expert answer
Colin Bridgewater expert
Colin Bridgewater Technology Coordinator London, GB
Education expert

Without repeating what others have said, the other thing to consider when approaching a teacher about wanting to do a project digitally is whether the school blocks sites that you want to use. Some schools block YouTube, so that would make it difficult to share your project if that's the case in your school.

It certainly can't hurt for students to propose an alternative method for doing an assignment to see what the teacher thinks.

2 Reply Share:
Experience 3 years ago
Adam Daly Gourdialsing
Adam Daly Gourdialsing FQ online editorial director London, GB

To follow on from Colin's point, many schools are increasingly setting homework through digital platforms such as http://samlearning.com and expecting the student to submit completed works through the same cloud based sites. With that in mind site blocking ceases to be quite the same issue. All in all a progressive development.

2 Reply Share:
Opinion 3 years ago
Олег Кияшко
Олег Кияшко Don't mind my display name >.< Kyiv, Ukraine

I guess yes if a school is equipped with proper tech, and if a subject has the stuff that can be done on a computer. As a child, I knew the intermediate level of Adobe PageMaker and a very little bit of Adobe InDesign, and was making the books and advertisements of fictional companies. My mother was carrying the CDs for printing, and I was enjoying the result of the printed work.

At that time, I was in 1-3 grades. My parents said that I can't make the projects in printed form, because of reasons like "teachers want to see kids's soul of their working hard with paperwork, writing calligraphically like a Chinese, and drawing like a professional artist, instead of using soulless and pointless computers" (which is inherently Luddite) or "there is a right age for everything, and for computer it is 13" (which is common sense-ist and age-ist). Now I think that kids really should be able to make a homework in digital form, or provide a digitally made homework in analog (paper) form. I guess my little brother will not be imposed to such stuff =.=

As for handwriting stuff, now you can use a pen tablet to write in digital form, and I guess that a software that uses handwriting recognition to teach kids to write by hand is a very powerful solution to the stencil boards... which kids may treat silly ^^

1 Reply Share:
Experience 3 years ago
Jessica Alley
Jessica Alley

It depends on the order given by the teacher to the classroom. If the teacher has said so and the students did so, then everything is fine. However, I read in an australian writing that some of the old timers find it difficult to use technology and prefer traditional methods. Whereas young teachers obviously want it easy and go for advanced methods where they can just edit and send back the papers. If you ask me, I would never allow digital submission and ask the students to write with their own hands and carry the papers on their shoulders and present it with pride in front of the class.

0 Reply Share:
Opinion 3 months ago

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